Saturday, May 28, 2011

Installing the Bathroom Exaust Fan

I’ve recently finished installing my bathroom fan system.  Rather than have an individual ceiling fan in each bathroom, I’ve installed a single remote fan to ventilate both bathrooms.  The fan is installed in an area away from the bathrooms and exhausts out the roof.  This results in a quiet and efficient system.  I’ll put in a timer switch in each bathroom, so the fan can be set to run for 5 – 30 minutes and then shut off automatically.

The white vent pipe you can see in the photos is 4” PVC pipe.  I’ve used the rigid PVC pipe rather than the flexible accordion-style pipe because the PVC pipe walls are smooth, so there is less air resistance than in the flexible pipes.  The pipes run from both the bathroom ceilings to a Y-fitting on the intake side of the fan unit.  The fan exhausts through a 6” diameter pipe to a roof vent.  The 6” pipe is flexible aluminum pipe, but it’s only two feet long so there isn’t a lot of air resistance to deal with. 


The fan I used is a Fantech FR 150.  It’s rated at 263 cfm, which should be plenty for both bathrooms.  It’s amazingly quiet.  Even when standing right next to it, you can barely tell that it’s running.  All you can hear is the air rushing through the pipes. 

Here’s a link if you’d like more information: http://fantech.net/docs-resi/450399-fr-brochure.pdf


The ducting connections to the fan are sealed with aluminum duct tape.   It's different than traditional duct tape; which will dry out and peel away.  This is actually made of thin aluminum and will last for the life of the fan.

1 comment:

  1. Just found your site as a carpenter the pictures tell it all.
    -Rob

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